What’s the Net Easy Score (NES) for your restaurant or cafe?

You’re probably heard of NPS or Net Promoter Score, a simple measurement of how likely people are to do business with you again. Another way to measure your business is with the Net Easy Score or NES. Based on work by Sue Barrett, it looks at all the ways your business is easy, or difficult, to deal with. Here’s a version for restaurants, cafes and foodservice.

Score your business on each of these factors from 1 to 10 – 1 for very difficult to deal with, through to 10, which is for being frictionless, delightful, and extremely easy to deal with. To keep the list manageable, some points contain a couple of service factors.

  1. Finding the business on Google or Apple Map, or a Google search – clear description and useful information with correct opening times, useful photos and website links. How does the search work on a mobile phone? Parking and public transport access to the business is easy to find and close.
  2. Phone calls get through to someone who can help me straight away. Phone messages and email inquiries are returned promptly with useful information. Texting is used for quick responses.
  3. Online reviews give me a clear picture of the business. Google, Facebook, Trip Advisor etc. The main social media channels are informative and friendly.
  4. The website is informative with accurate menus, opening hours, directions and a good impression of the business.
  5. The menu is easy to read, and can be accessed in advance online and on a phone. There are good explanations of the food and beverages. It’s easy to get food for my dietary needs eg vegetarian, vegan, gluten free – doesn’t feel like the choice is very limited.
  6. It’s easy to order online for delivery or pickup – menu on familiar ordering platforms, easy to understand. Simple payment including Apple/Google Pay to avoid the ‘get off the couch’ issue – when you need to go to find your card. Booking is easy to do via online booking system or with a phone call
  7. Speed of service, response times, welcome, ordering, delivery and finalising the account – this cuts through most of the items on the list. The speed is appropriate to the situation – not rushed for fine dining, definitely speedy for drive-through or takeaway. Never frustrating.
  8. Helpful, efficient staff who can answer questions and give prompt, friendly service. When things become complicated, how easy is it to sort them out? Walking in to eat or drink, it’s easy to obtain a table, and the system is clear – all the seats are in good locations.
  9. Toilets are accessible, clean and safe. Obvious attention to cleaning, hygiene and Covid safety routines.
  10. Payment is easy and safe at the counter, or when I’m ready to leave – cash or card, tap and go. If there’s queue for service or payment, it moves quickly.

How did you go? A score above 80/100 puts you in the Nice & Easy category – a preferred place to do business in today’s difficult climate… we will definitely be back!

🤚 Check the weekly discoveries on Hospo Reset – information & inspiration for restaurant, cafe & foodservice operators.

How to use QR Codes for restaurant marketing and management – dozens of easy examples

Everyone understands QR codes, now that they’re compulsory for COVID check-ins. Point your smartphone camera at a QR code, and a website or app will pop up.

In fact QR codes have been around for many years, and widely used in Asian countries – now that they’re understood here, you can start to leverage them for restaurant & cafe marketing, recruitment and daily operations. How many of these ideas can you use?

It’s easy to create your own QR codes – for a web page, WiFi access, a feedback form or to check off a worklist. Use a web service like Scanova.io or BeaconStac or QRcode-monkey.com, or a QR generator phone app. The Chrome web browser now automatically generates a QR Code for every web page you visit – click on the right side of the URL address bar. Download the square code you create and add it to signs or stickers – easy.

📸 .. Check dozens of ways that QR codes are being used on this special Instagram Account – new examples added all the time.

Put your Front Window to Work: a couple of QR codes can lead to a welcome video from the owners, a downloadable copy of the menu, TripAdvisor reviews or more information about opening hours and bookings. Now you have a 24/7 billboard – place the codes on a poster or on a digital slide.

Boost your recruitment with a link to your main recruitment page, and liven this up with some one-minute video testimonials from staff, or an overview of daily work routines. From this page, people can click and fill out a job application form ready for you to respond.

Include a code in printed marketing material: flyers, postcards and posters can all have a QR code added for contact details, Facebook and Instagram accounts or special Coupons.

Take-Away Menus: print a QR Code on table tents, front door posters or where you’ll catch a customer’s eye. Scanning the code directs them to a digital version of your menu on the web, or as a PDF. Take it one step further and integrate this with an ordering app, so they can browse, click, choose and pay.

Share Recipes and Food Stories: put a small QR Code on your menu next to key dishes. Smartphone users can then scan the code and be taken to a recipe, or even a video of it being made. Too many codes could look unsightly, so have one that leads to a page where more links can be clicked.

Information about Wine and Cocktails: distributors and wineries often have detailed information on their websites – the QR code could lead straight to this, or to pages you’ve set up (so you don’t have to show the supplier’s pricing).

Feedback Surveys: place a QR Code on the receipt, and ask for instant feedback. This works even better when staff remind customers that it’s just 3 questions – put them on a Google Form or with a free app like Wufoo. Take it one step further and give the option to join your email list to receive promotions. Surprisingly, with compulsory check-ins now a part of every visit, most venues are not turning customer sign-ups into newsletter subscribers. Even a ‘thanks for visiting’ email can make a difference!

Nutritional Information: there’s a wide range of information available online – now you can link directly to it for the people who are interested. This avoids your menu becoming like Wikepedia – the facts are there just for those who want them.

Download a phone app: if you have your own app, or want people to use one for ordering, a QR code can be set up to go to the Apple or Android app store, according to the phone being used.

Ordering lists, instruction sheets, operating systems and food safety routines can all be accessed online with a QR code – generate it for the web page or relevant documents. Dymo Printers or A4 label sheets can be set up to print the labels with a description underneath, so there’s no confusion.

Opening and closing routines, COVID and food-safety checklists can be set up in Google Forms or specialist apps like iAuditor – a QR sticker on the wall will trigger them for each location or time of day. Even those hourly checklists behind the bathroom door can be a thing of the past!

Need equipment repairs? Have a QR code for repair information and manuals, all on one laminated sheet on the kitchen wall or in a folder.

When you need to generate bulk quantities of QR Codes on labels or as images, there are services to do that eg QR Batch, or it could be part of the software you are using eg Shopify.

🤚 Check the weekly discoveries on Hospo Reset – information & inspiration for restaurant, cafe & foodservice operators.

QR code examples

10 Ways to Reduce Noise in your Cafe or Restaurant – and Bring Customers Back!

Why don’t people come back, after they enjoyed your food and the service? It could be the noise – too loud to talk with friends and feel relaxed.

Here’s a bunch of ideas for noise reduction, if you have to do it after your venue opens. The fact is, most architects and designers give little thought to effective noise reduction, creating hard-surface boxes with all 6 sides reflective so the noise bounces like bullets to kill our enjoyment.

It’s good to understand some of the technicalities of noise and how it’s created and reduced – the excellent Acoustical Surfaces blog is full of great articles such as Soundproofing vs Sound Absorbing – What’s the Difference? and Noisy restaurant solutions- when peace and quiet are not on the menu. Noise is measured in decibels, and the different levels are listed below. Measure it with a noise meter app from the iOS or Google App store – they’re good enough to show you the level of pain, which can quickly move into the danger level (above 80 dB) in a noisy venue.

Here are some easy ways to reduce noise in restaurants and cafes…

  • Acoustic panels – attached to walls or ceiling. These can be the expensive sound baffles like they use in a recording studio (they absorb sound) or simpler ones from a hardware like Bunnings. Even egg crates can be combined in an interesting way if your look is ‘cheap and cheerful’.
  • DIY acoustic panels – foam stuck onto plywood cut to size, covered with interesting fabric. In Australia, Clark Rubber has foams of all thicknesses and grades that they will cut to size.
  • Hang attractive floor rugs from the walls. There are many varieties at markets that could double as interesting art, and IKEA has a wide range at low cost
  • Hessian coffee sacks, filled with padding and hung as interesting wall features – another idea for a casual environment.
  • Padded panels between tables, to create more intimate spaces and reduce sound. Better in a more formal space with a large area.
  • Cushions and padding on chairs and benches – it all helps.
  • Tablecloths! Out of fashion in many places, but they do the job very well. Avoid padding under tables – it makes a slight improvement but feels a bit creepy when if you reach underneath.
  • Carpet! In my Cafe Troppo days, we had commercial carpet tiles in a charcoal grey and sound was never an issue. Steam cleaned once a month and very few spills to worry about – people don’t notice what’s on the floor. Artificial grass is also an option, and could be used in strips or as a feature – it’s done effectively by the Cafe 63 group in Queensland.
  • Turn down the music – it’s often up loud because of all the other noise, and people can hardly hear it anyway! You don’t need stereo in a large space, but you do need quality sound. Small speakers spaced around will be sufficient rather than a couple of big stereo speakers. If good music is a special feature at your place, it’s important that people can hear and enjoy it.
  • Reduce noise from the bar – blenders and appliances can be intrusive, best to have them with shields and covers.

Understanding noise levels…
Loud noise causes damage in two ways: the actual volume, and the length of time exposed to it. A noisy venue could result in occupational health and safety issues – attention clubs and entertainers!

Here’s a detailed chart of noise levels, and a quick summary of decibel levels:

140 – Jet engine at 30 m
130 – Rivet hammer (pain can be felt at this threshold)
120 – Rock drill – level at which PAIN BEGINS
110 – Chainsaw
100 – Sheet metal workshop
90 – Lawn mower
80 – Kerbside heavy traffic – level at which sustained exposure may cause HEARING LOSS
70 – Loud conversation
60 – Normal conversation

🤚 Check the weekly discoveries on Hospo Reset – information & inspiration for restaurant, cafe & foodservice operators.

Seen behind the bar in a Las Vegas nighclub…

5 Ways to Drive Word of Mouth Marketing for a Cafe or Restaurant

Many people assume ‘word of mouth’ works automatically, and it’s always positive. As if people will say the nicest things without you making any effort. Sorry, that’s not going to  happen! And word of mouth can also be negative – ‘OMG did you hear that place got a food poisoning fine, and they’ve been underpaying their chefs!’.

However there are ways to guarantee that people have a lot to talk about, and you rise above the sameness of other new places having their six  months of fame. It starts with the promises you make – if they’re too flamboyant, you’re asking for disappointment. Claiming to have ‘Adelaide’s best dessert menu’ implies a 10/10 experience, so what happens when customers enjoy it but only feels it’s worth 8/10. In other situations, 8/10 is a great result, but here they have been disappointed. Under-promise so you over-deliver.

Here are the 5 sure ways you can put Word of Mouth marketing on automatic, ticking over each day and giving people lots to share with their friends.

Design is the first – does your place look wonderful, or quirky, or unusual? Does it have some features like no-one else? It could be beautiful lamps or mirrors, or filled with original paintings like Lucio’s Restaurant in Paddington. Or have wonderful views or a garden courtyard, an old fireplaces with real fires or a big bowl of fresh fruit (like the picture below). Something that lifts it beyond the average and, these days, gets people to take out their phone and snap a photo. Up onto Instagram or Snapchat, making their friends a little jealous. What can you add that’s bigger, brighter and bolder?

Speed and Movement is next – it’s the opposite of slow and boring. Most times we don’t want to be rushed, but if we only have 30 minutes for lunch, the place that can seat, serve and take our payment in 25 minutes is the one we will tell all our friends about. Or a place with a visible kitchen, and chefs flaming food and calling orders. Or the cocktail bar is alive with action as drinks are built, shaken and served with flare – have you been to that place? You can design in these features, but make sure you don’t sacrifice service.

Generosity is a sure-fire WOM promoter – did you see those family-size pizzas loaded with toppings? Not like the $10 special that disappointed us last week. Help yourself at the amazing buffet, and your wine by the glass is filled to half full, not just a mean little puddle.

This also works in the community – people hear about your consistent support for community groups, apprentice training, recycling programs and homeless relief. Make sure they acknowledge your contribution.

Great Flavours drive word of mouth – Australians like big, bold tastes and textures. The famous Strawberry Watermelon Cake at Black Star Pastry, or the hot, spicy coconut laksa at your favourite Malaysian place. The IPA ales that a new craft brewery creates are way better than the beer giants, or that delicate Victorian pinot gris you serve by the glass. Memorable.

Inside Information is your final WOM booster – with the crazy growth of TV food shows, cooking classes and social photos, everyone loves to know what’s happening back-of-house. Where the beef comes from (and why you changed suppliers), how you get such intense flavours in the dessert, and where the pastry chef was trained. And with that $20,000 oven you’ve just installed – offer a sneaky kitchen tour when the rush dies down. And is that Justin the head chef talking to customers? Wait till I tell my friends!

Fresh quinces are an unusual thing to find in a cafe, and sure to be something that food-loves notice…

Sharing ideas about how to make Webinars more interesting

It was great to share my thoughts with the Facilitation Queen Leanne Hughes, about how to make webinars more engaging and interesting. With looming restrictions on live gatherings, they have to be in the toolkit of every trainer and meeting facilitator. The SilverChef webinars I’ve started have had a great response, and this method of teaching and learning is becoming much more familiar and popular.

Here’s Leanne sharing her experience, and drawing on the ideas of me and others on her podcast First Time Facilitator...

Your comments and suggestions are very welcome – please send them to me through Linkedin or Facebook.

Show the Sparkling Cleanliness of Your Business to Reassure Anxious Customers

News about the spread of Coronavirus is not good, and people are starting to panic – we need to stand as islands of calm and true hospitality, while taking important precautions. It’s also time to take urgent management action to protect your profitability.

You can stand out from the crowd by being spotlessly CLEAN and HYGIENIC. Here are some quick ways to make this obvious to customers. There also need to be special precautions with staff who are coughing or appear to be sick. If they’re casual or on hourly pay, they may feel they can’t afford to miss work, even if unwell – watch closely.

It’s essential to get staff on board with the reasons, not just the actions – discuss with the team HOW they can be subtly showing just how clean and responsible your place is. Their education is vitally important. Explain the theatre of it – we don’t just DO clean, we show off how thorough we are, and many small things make a difference. It’s using the well-known marketing principle: Know > Like > Trust…

  • Get KNOWN as a reliably hygienic, friendly, clean place
  • Be well LIKED for all the little things
  • Building TRUST keeps people coming back

Front of House:

  • Have hand sanitiser available for customers at the entrance. And on the counter, where staff are seen to use it.
  • Spotlessly clean uniforms – how are those aprons and chef jackets looking? If they need an upgrade, include everyone – don’t leave the poor kitchen hand in his street clothes and old apron #respect
  • Blitz and tidy the drinks station, with baristas and bar staff constantly wiping down surfaces. These areas are often full of clutter – take a hard look.
  • Suspend the use of reusable cups (Keep Cups) for takeaway coffee – it’s great to avoid single-use cups, but cups that customers bring could be a contamination risk.
  • No more clearing glasses with fingers through the rim! Trays should be standard for clearing and delivery – this will also make it faster. Remind staff that they may be touching people’s spit, and encourage lots more hand-washing.
  • Clean condiment bottles plus salt & pepper containers on tables very regularly – make it obvious. Might be time to temporarily swap to disposables.
  • Stop offering cutlery in a container on the table – it’s not hygienic, especially with the knife blade and fork prongs facing up! Think about it!
  • Review cleaning practices: do staff wipe down a seat then use the same cloth to wipe the the table? Ewww! Or use the same cloth to wipe the drinks bench and the steam wand on the espresso machine? Yukkk! Handling garnishes for drinks with their hands – no way!
  • Food Safety Supervisor courses are always useful, and there are many online – encourage more staff to do them, and pay the fees. They cover much more than hand-washing. Promote the number of graduates you have (post on Facebook or Instagram), and give them a special role to play, front and back of house.
  • Using kiosks for ordering? Have someone regularly wiping them down with a sanitised cloth. People cringe at the sight of sticky finger marks.
  • Dump the grubby toys in the kids corner – they should have gone years ago! If you want something for children, have new small toys in sealed bags – check a party supply shop.
  • Scrub the chair legs – they’re often scuffed and marked. You don’t notice, but it adds to an overall impression of untidiness.
  • Double check for ‘sticky places’ – chair arms, under the edges of tables, worn carpet, table surfaces. These buildups happen over time and need a special cleaning effort – eliminate the yuk factor.
  • Is it time for a mystery customer program, with a special section on cleaning and hygiene, not just service.?

Kitchen:

  • Check the public view of the kitchen from outside – through a window or back door. How does it look – as clean as a hospital, or a mess? It’s easy to overlook cracked tiles, dirty bins and greasy surfaces when we’re busy, but now that it’s quieter, there is no excuse. Time to lean = time to clean.
  • Upgrade the view through the pass into the kitchen – can customers see pots and pans with grubby bases? They need to be scrubbed to a shine, because the overall appearance is gross.
  • Replace fluorescent tubes that have lost their brightness – they fade long before they die. You need the space very well lit, so dirt and stains are easily seen.
  • Double-down on glove use, and avoid staff touching food with bare hands where customers can see it. We know that gloves don’t guarantee hygiene, but the perception is important. Use latex-free gloves to avoid allergies.

Bathrooms:

  • Clean and repaint the bathroom – is it a sanctuary, an afterthought, or gross? Any cracked tiles or loose fitting that need fixing? People assume your kitchen will match the cleanliness of the toilets.
  • Upgrade the soap dispenser, towels and hand-drying facilities. Add sanitiser.
  • Reinforce the cleaning patrols, all through the day and night. Have a special bucket with equipment and gloves. It’s no-one’s favourite job – include the manager and boss so you all share the ‘dirty work’.
  • Put up a cleaning checklist and timetable on the back of the door – you don’t just do this, but you advertise how conscientious you are.

This is just the start… 2020 could be a challenging year, and your obvious commitment to hygiene can give you a strong marketing advantage.

Your comments and suggestions are very welcome – please send them to me through Linkedin or Facebook.

McDonalds is retraining our customers, and it’s a good thing…

Here’s the revamped McDonalds in Sydney’s inner suburb of Kingsford.

24 (twenty four) kiosks have replaced the queuing area, and the pickup counter is now just a small area on the side. The McCafe remains (on the right). You can order at the counter, but there are no visible registers or signage to indicate this. Cooking is now out of sight.

Trays are gone, and if you choose to dine in instead of takeaway, you grab a large table number and your food is brought to your table in a bag. A helpful concierge is circulating around the screens to help anyone hesitating – just like they do at Coles self-checkout or airline check-ins.

Presumably MyMacca’s app ordering is still being used, but the push here is to kiosks, not order-at-the table systems (like OrderUp, Me&U etc). This may change – the kiosk installation could be easily modified. Just as Maccas taught us new ordering behaviour years ago – order first, then sit (instead of the other way around), now they are schooling the generations on the ease of kiosks. They’ve also given more importance to two traditional concepts – the Maitre D’ (in this case the kiosk concierge), whose job is to float and be helpful. And table service is back, presumably because it’s actually faster and more productive – I’d love to see their productivity analysis.

Head to your latest updated McD, look around and do some productivity numbers for your own place – what’s possible?

Dealing With Copycats…

Tell the truth – most restaurant and foodservice ideas are some version of what you’ve seen or eaten before. You could call it ‘creative swiping’ instead of copying or plagiarism, but it’s rare for any chef or restaurateur to create a full set of completely original ideas for a new menu or cocktail list. Remember that trip to Chicago, Bali or Barcelona – tasting, taking photos and dreaming up how you could do an Aussie version for your customers?

And sometimes true originality does happen – a magic combination of sauce, spice, protein and fire. An unusual chocolate cake, upside down ice-cream or lethal cocktail – the stuff that drives word-of-mouth, Instagram and crazy return customers.

What can be copied? A recipe, decoration and furniture ideas, a menu layout, fonts, website design or even a name – how many times have you seen an Aussie concept that copies a US original?

What can be stolen? Your chef, your manager, the best waiter and some of your customers…

READ the rest of my Copycat article on p.24 of this months Hospitality magazine

Bar and restaurant found in Madrid…

When You Take Over a Cafe or Restaurant – How to Do It Right

A while back I wrote about the decline of a favourite cafe now under new ownership. I was challenged to give suggestions for how this could be done well, so here’s my To-Do list for the new business owner:

New Faces: own it, and let people know who’s who. Now’s the time for name tags (yes!) and the owner or manager could even add a cheeky label to say ‘Proud New Owner’.  Could you get a ‘best wishes’ message from the old owner? Put it up on the wall for all to see.

This is also time to say goodbye to staff who weren’t adding to the business – the slow and the negative. In most situations, you have a unique opportunity to let go of previous employees without any obligation – the previous owner should be paying them out, or compensating you for any accrued benefits they have (eg long service leave). New owner, new start – talk to your lawyer.

Do More of What Was Done Well: the great cakes, the friendly greeting, excellent coffee (don’t change the blend!) and the special services. Keep buying flowers and providing newspapers.

Fix the Weak System: businesses are rarely sold because they’re making too much money… it’s usually the opposite, no matter what stories you were told by the broker! Audit and start upgrading the ordering systems, stocktaking, recipe costing, booking and customer service procedures. Are staff signing on and off correctly? Assume that there’s been internal theft, and look for system gaps that have allowed this eg stocktaking, POS not being used correctly, cash handling etc. Once you close off these opportunities, the thieves will soon leave.

Dig Into the Numbers: the figures you were given from the old business are probably a bit sketchy, but you will soon find valuable information from your POS and the bills you pay. A well-setup cloud accounting system is essential eg Xero or MYOB, so you can track results day by day – get your accountant onto this immediately. Detailed figures from the POS will soon show best and worst sellers, plus sales by hour and day. A good roster system like Tanda or Deputy let’s you compare wage costs against sales – even a spreadsheet will help to find areas of strength and weakness. Slice and dice all the numbers you can – opportunities will be right there in front of you.

Clean and Repair: businesses for sale often look tired, and cleaning is one of the first things to be neglected. Blitz the floors, and ceilings, plus behind counters and shelves – you’ll be surprised at what you find. Fix the broken appliances, toss out old platters and pots, ditch the broken furniture. Front of house, fix wobbly tables and repair all the dings and scratches on furniture. Paint the toilets and install new toilet seats and amenities.

Don’t Redecorate Just Yet: if you’re launching a whole new concept, go for it. But if you value the concept you bought, minimise the redecoration until you’ve settled in. Once you know more about the customers and service rhythm, you’ll be clearer about new decor.

Leave the Menu Alone: there will be weaknesses that need to be fixed, but in the first few months you are stabilising the ship, sorting out the staff and making friends with customers. You’re also finding out what customers really like, so use the specials board to try new ideas. Ask questions and listen.

Improve the Marketing: another area where the previous owners were probably economising or forgetful. Increase the friendliness and frequency of posts on Facebook and Instagram, including targeted ads. Check that your ‘Google My Business’ listing is up to date and has plenty of photos. The website may need a major improvement – this should be a high priority, with better photos, more relevant information and optimised for mobile phones. If an email newsletters was being send, use it to spread good news – another area where things had probably slipped.

Improve Staff Culture and Conditions: that includes fairer treatment, proper pay, better rostering and good communication channels. There will be times you are told ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’ – just smile and explain why it needs to change. Don’t be surprised if within 3 months all the old staff have left – it usually happens with new management. Yes, even the ones who say you’re much nicer than the old boss! Staff manuals and policies, job descriptions and a noticeboard – they’re all part of the healthy new broom.

Invisible? How to Stop Customers Forgetting Your Restaurant

Unless you’re a major industry icon, or they’ve visited 5 times, most people don’t remember your business name…

True story: 2 people in café, one on the phone. She looks at her friend and asks ‘what’s the name of this place?’…and the friend doesn’t know! Worse, there was nothing inside the café to tell them – no signs, nothing on the table or staff uniforms. Future business lost for sure.

Before you go spending big money on expensive promotion, check that you’ve covered all the small, personal promotional items within your 4 walls. You could double your business if everyone came back at least once!

Increase the number of times your business name is seen:

  • The business name on the wall or menu – make it part of the decoration.
  • Business name on awnings and the front window – if it’s just on the awning, people walking or driving by may not see it.
  • The name on the side and back of your company vehicles – include the website so it’s easy to find you later.
  • Name and contact details on the docket a customer takes away.
  • Business cards for people to keep. Makes sure there’s one with every account.
  • Souvenir menus at the counter, even if it’s just a sample.
  • Auto-response to inquiry emails. It automatically bounces back saying something like:
    Thanks for your inquiry – we will be in touch with you shortly. Don’t forget all our menus are online at wvw.ourwebsite.com’…
  • Business name on staff uniforms – just as important as the staff name.
  • Prominent website address – as big as every other mention of your name. If it’s not logical eg hgc.com instead of HillsideGolfClub.com, fix this – register the easier name as well, and have them both directing to the same website. If you spell the web name with some capitals (like this example), it’s easier to remember and won’t affect search behaviour.
  • Business name used in menu items eg at Café Troppo we had the ‘Troppo Burger’ and ‘Troppo Trifle’ – distinctive and memorable.
  • And of course your website comes up first when we do a Google search – many businesses still don’t have this happen.

Make contact more personal to reinforce the memories:

  • Hand written ‘thank you’ on the docket or account
  • A personal acknowledgement: ‘Thank you Mr Burgin’ – when my credit card is brought back to me, or when my account details are present eg checkout. If Qantas can do it loading 200 people on a plane, so can you!
  • Real faces on the website gallery – happy staff and happy customers, plus busines owners and managers with short biographical details.

Nice place, but where am I?