Restaurants & Cafes with B Corp Accreditation

The B Corp movement says that business impacts and serves more than just shareholders – it also has a responsibility to the community and to the planet. B Corps meet high standards of social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. They ‘aspire to use the power of markets to solve social and environmental problems’.

In the latest podcast interview, Ken Burgin talks with business advisor Tim O’Brien of Hatched.io about the value of B Corp accreditation, and how to achieve it. This involves assessing your performance in the areas of environmental impact, the workforce, customers, community and corporate governance. Start with the free B Impact Assessment – you may be surprised at how well you do, and B Corp advisers will help with the process.

For more on B Corporations in action, hear how Pablo & Rusty Coffee Roasters became certified, and the value it has added to their business. Plus the interview with Court Desautels of Canada’s Neighbourhood Restaurant Group, on the value of their B Corp accreditation, and Silver Chef founder Allan English on Business as a Force for Good.

How to Promote your Green Credentials for a Marketing Bonus

Whatever you’re doing on the environmental front, it’s worth talking about and publicising. Consumers are very interested, and so are corporate and government clients – in some cases, they’ve been told to make this a priority in their choice of venues.

Put a short Environmental Action Statement on your website, and  keep adding to it as you make improvements. Here’s what to include:

Energy Efficiency: how you work to reduce energy use with lighting, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, appliances, office equipment, and transport.

Green Power: is your electricity supply contract from renewable resources that use wind, solar, geothermal or hydro-electric?

Carbon Offset Program: explain the program you use and the savings made. Comparing the numbers before and after can be very impressive.

Water Conservation: methods used for kitchen appliances, equipment and landscaping, and in a way that does not compromise hygiene and cleanliness.

Recycling: glass, plastic, metal, cardboard, paper, corks, waste oil, ink and toner cartridges are all a part of daily operations. Describe how you recycle them.

Source Reduction: Do suppliers take back the packaging supplied with deliveries or eliminate it altogether? Are polystyrene foam boxes and package still accepted with deliveries?

Sustainable Food: used where possible to support the long-term viability of agriculture, fishing and grazing. Sourcing food locally to reduce the use of fossil fuel in transport.

Tree-free Products: used wherever possible, ensuring that wooden furniture and any wooden items do not come from old-growth forests.

Non-toxic Cleaning Products: are used that are biodegradable, free of hazardous ingredients, and safe for people and the environment.

Employee Education: at the heart of an environmental commitment – how are staff educated and how is their commitment sustained? It would not be possible without their contribution.

Start with what you do now, and update as you add activities – it won’t take long for the page to be impressive! Need inspiration? Listen to this recent Podcast on Sustainability for Cafes & the Coffee Industry.