How to Have More Success Promoting Chef Jobs in Rural Areas

Your country cafe or restaurant offers good conditions, proper pay, decent hours, a friendly boss and a modern kitchen. So why can’t you find good staff? It’s time for a shift in how you promote the opportunities – the talent is out there, so let’s update the recruitment methods.

Promote the benefits of your area. Check the local tourist authority and council websites – they know how to talk up the town. Country rents and real estate can be much less expensive than the city – don’t forget to mention this in your advertisements. If there is a problem with accommodation, solve it – it can be a deal-breaker, and needs to be part of the whole package. Your website should include information about local attractions, schools and lifestyle, and transport links, as well as opening hours, facilities and menus. This could be the chance for a chef to buy their own house, which they could never afford in a big city.

Advertise positions so the whole country finds them. On your own website and using national job websites. Savvy candidates will check your website, and won’t be impressed if it looks outdated. Facebook advertising is also an option – it can be targeted to a particular area or type of person. See: How to Write Restaurant Job Advertisements That Get a Much Better Response

Consider using a professional recruiter. Use a service that does all the work – hunting, shortlisting, interviewing and recommending. It will cost a few thousand dollars, but the cost of DIY is much more than that – and you know how that’s worked in the past!

Make use of a migration agent. You’re likely to have a lot of applicants who want help to achieve permanent residency. This can be a great opportunity, but immigration laws are complex and changing all the time. Experienced agents can help to screen and assess applicants. With drastic reductions to visitor visas, overseas workers are no longer the answer that they were before 2020.

Update the menu. If the highlight of your offer is a burger & chips, you won’t be successful in attracting young chefs. TV food shows are popular in every part of Australia, and everyone is thinking about food in a new way. Keep the favourites, and a fresh new approach is essential – it needs to be led by the owner.

Build a relationship with the local school. Hospitality is a popular subject, and your teamwork with dedicated teachers will mean you are the first to hear about the best students. Host site visits and work-experience students, offer to be a guest speaker and find out what they need to improve school-to-work transition. Make friends first and the favours will follow.

Keep in touch with former staff. Invite staff to connect with your Facebook page – social media means friendships don’t have to be lost or forgotten. Keep posting photos of staff enjoying their work, as well as the usual food and event shots. Every month or so ‘boost’ a post about happy staff to your fans, so they all see it.

Find work for the partners. If the new chef is arriving with a family, chances are her partner needs work too. How can you help with this? What about her son who will be looking for an apprenticeship in greenkeeping or pastry?

Jump onto the training bandwagon. It won’t take long to find a training provider who will support with supervision, materials and even a subsidy. Everyone needs to start ‘growing their own’, and the hospitality training sector is highly developed.

Think outside the square about who you will employ. You may prefer a low-cost 16-year-old, but the 45-year-old mum could be more stable and flexible, even if you need to ‘untrain’ a few habits as well as installing new ones. Set your standards high – if the applicant doesn’t meet them but has a good attitude, get the coaching and feedback started.